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IAB Announces 2019 Bookmark Awards Finalists

IAB Announces 2019 Bookmark Awards Finalists

The 11th Annual Bookmark Awards will be held at The Forum in Bryanston on 28 March 2019 in partnership with Vicinity-Media. 68 judges across 76 categories reviewed and judged over 750 Bookmark Award entries these past few weeks, with the anticipated shortlist being announced.

Jerry Mpufane, 2019 IAB Bookmark Awards Jury President said, ‘We are thrilled with the list of finalists. Each one sets a precedent for excellent work in their category and represents the exciting, diverse range of talent in the South African digital industry.’

The 2019 IAB Bookmark Awards honours students, individuals, agencies, publishers and brands that have produced creative and innovative work that delivers on their set business objectives. The final round of judging takes place on-site in Johannesburg and Cape Town from 8-9 March 2019 and the winners will be announced at the 11th Annual Bookmark Awards on 28 March 2019.

Molefi Thulo, Jury Chair of the Marketers Panel said, ‘I was struck by the depth of insights that went into creating some of the work, and also by how digital platforms are being used to create meaningful connections between brands and their consumers.’

The Marketing Panel received a record number of entries this year with the final list trending in the following categories: Branded Content, Craft Excellence in Online Video Production, Social Media Campaigns and Social Media Innovation. Mobile features across the board, and specialists’ entries for Channel Innovation, Internet of Things, Artificial Intelligence and Paid Search Marketing are strong, but Social and Video are the more dominant categories in the 2019 Bookmark Awards finalist list.

New publisher categories for the 2019 IAB Bookmark Awards includes, but are not limited to: Data Stories, Online News Videos and Social Media News Coverage feature, but in the finals, Craft News, Feature Writing and News Innovation dominate. The judges are also excited to see who wins the new Special Honours category: IAB Bookmark Awards Best Online Journalist on the 28th of March.

Izak Minnaar, Jury Chair of the publishers panel commented, ‘Digital publishing is moving through a period in which the very integrity of the medium is being challenged. This year’s publishing entries reflect this landscape and provide innovative strategies to thriving in today’s digital world.’

‘It is exciting to see the wide mix of brands, agencies, publishers, consultancies, and specialists in our finalist list this year and this excludes the Special Honours entries that are judged in Round 2. We attribute this to both the hard work across the industry to create and share their business case studies, as well as the diversity of our judging panels in 2019. The final round of judging will be hard work, but with strong results to set the bar for digital excellence that drives business results in South Africa, and beyond,’ said Paula Hulley IAB CEO.

Audrey Naidoo, Head of Digital for Absa and a member of the Builders panel added, ‘Digital businesses in South Africa are becoming adept at using technical excellence to create user experiences that drive results.’

2019 Finalists

BRAND

PRODUCT

TITLE

ENTRY AGENCY

   Artificial

Intelligence

Red Bull Studios

Red Bull Studios Algorhythm

Publicis Machine

Debonairs Pizza

On The Double

Christopher enhances social sentiment

The MediaShop

        Bots, Messaging & Dark Social

MARS Africa

Royco

Royco Rewards

Mobitainment, ARC South Africa, Asakhane

Sanlam

Sanlam My Choice Funeral Plan

Lives of Grace

King James Group

MultiChoice

DStv

DStv #Fanalysis Chat Group

Ogilvy 

Standard Bank 

Standard Bank SE Banking 

My Fearless Next 

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

The Coca-Cola Company

Coca-Cola

Coca-Cola FIFA World Cup Soccer Bot

Cerebra (WundermanSA)

Debonairs Pizza

On The Double

Christopher enhances social sentiment

The MediaShop

                                              Brand, Commercial & Retail Websites

Sanlam

Sanlam Financial Products

Conversations with Yourself

King James Group

Tiger Brands

Doom

Make Them Stop

TBWA Hunt Lascaris Johannesburg

Absa – L’Atelier

 L’Atelier art competition

L’Atelier 2018

Hellocomputer, FCB Africa

Cell C Girl

Cell C Girl Website

Arc Interactive

      

                   Branded Content

Builders Warehouse

Builders Summer Campaign

Publicis Machine

Sanlam

Sanlam My Choice Funeral Plan

Lives of Grace

King James Group

Sanlam

Sanlam Financial Services

The 200 Year Old

King James Group

Unilever

Magnum 

Magnum x MaXhosa

Digitas Liquorice 

Mercedes-Benz

S-Class

Return to Chapman’s Peak

Net#work BBDO

Sanlam

2 Minute Shower Songs

Francois Van Coke – Dit Raak Beter

King James Group

Sanlam

2 Minute Shower Songs

Rouge – DÉJÀ VU

King James Group

Sanlam

2 Minute Shower Songs

Goodluck – Taking It Easy

King James Group

Sanlam

2 Minute Shower Songs

Kwesta – Boomshakalaka

King James Group

Sanlam

Sanlam Investments

On Life and Surprises

King James Group

Sanlam

Sanlam Investments

On Life and Planning

King James Group

Sanlam

Sanlam Investments

On Life and Longevity

King James Group

Sanlam

Sanlam Investments

On Life and Bucket lists

King James Group

Absolut vodka

Vodka

Africa on Fire

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Joburg Ballet

Joburg Ballet

Breaking Ballet

TBWA Hunt Lascaris Johannesburg

Standard Bank 

Standard Bank SE Banking 

My Fearless Next 

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Philips & The Nelson Mandela Foundation

Philips 

#ShaveToRemember 

Ogilvy 

South African Tourism

South African Tourism

Bheki The Mbhaco Maker

Hellocomputer/FCB Africa

Sanlam

2 Minute Shower Songs

Desmond & the Tutus – Teenagers

King James Group

          Channel Innovation

Stones

Bottle Operated Table

Stones BOT

Publicis Machine

Sanlam

Sanlam My Choice Funeral Plan

Lives of Grace

King James Group

First National Bank, South Africa

FNB

FNB App 6.0 Snap Lens

BrandTruth & Sprout & Ad Dynamo (SnapChat)

MultiChoice

DStv

DStv #Fanalysis Chat Group

Ogilvy 

American Swiss Jewellers

Engagement Rings

Drop the Hint

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Cadbury P.S.

Cadbury P.S. 

#SayItWithPS

Ogilvy

Cell C

Data Bundles

Skip to the best bits

The MediaShop

South African Breweries

SAB Entrepreneurship

Your Business In Lights Billboard

Joe Public Connect

Black

Black

Boring Pre-roll Ads

Joe Public Connect

              Content Strategy

Sanlam

Sanlam My Choice Funeral Plan

Lives of Grace

King James Group

AVBOB

The AVBOB Poetry Competition

ENGAGE et al, a member of the et al GROUP

Philips & The Nelson Mandela Foundation

Philips 

#ShaveToRemember 

Ogilvy 

Western Cape Government

Department of Education

Raise your voice. Not your phone. 

Hellocomputer, FCB Africa

KFC

Streetwise 2

Make a Meal of it.

Ogilvy

Sanlam

Sanlam Financial Services

The 200 Year Old

King James Group

Unilever

Knorr

Leave No Food Behind 

Digitas Liquorice 

Cipla South Africa

Asthma Inhaler Casings, Comic Book,

Bronki Boosters

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

American Swiss Jewellers

Engagement Rings

Drop the Hint

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

Sanlam

Sanlam Financial Products

Conversations with Yourself

King James Group & 42 Digital

Sanlam

2 Minute Shower Songs

2 Minute Shower Songs

King James Group

                                                         Craft – Digital Media

American Swiss Jewellers

Engagement Rings

Drop the Hint

VML South Africa (Pty) Ltd

WesBank

Dialling Down the Call Centre

Rogerwilco

Mercedes-Benz

X-Class

X-Class

Performics

For the full list of finalists click here

Tickets for the awards ceremony can be purchased here.

BOOKMARK AWARDS thebookmarks.co.za

Is Digital Burnout A Thing?

Is Digital Digital Burnout A Thing?
Image source: www.inc.com

It is March 2019 already, but I still remember thinking about my goals for the year and chatting to colleagues about how fast 2018 flew by. Is it just me or does everyone seem tired this early in the year?

We have already found the need for a quick weekend away from the hustle and bustle of city life. Weekends just cannot come any sooner and when they do, we find ourselves saying ‘where did this week go’?

At the end of January, I heard a radio interview with South African trend analyst, Dion Chang, where he confirmed my sentiments by saying that South Africans are tired this early in the year because of a phenomenon called digital burnout.

The lines between our online and offline worlds are fast becoming blurry and the addiction to one’s smartphone is quite apparent. We saw it on our weekend away, where people probably had the same idea of relaxing and escaping from the busy city. The irony though was that everyone had a phone in their hand, quite engaged and oblivious to their surroundings or the people they were with.

I put it down to our need for feeding our virtual existence – something that is becoming more prominent than our physical existence. We must ‘check in on Facebook, ‘update our story’ on Instagram, Tweet about the experience and tag the relevant people. Oh, and add a few Snaps with cute furry ear filters, just for good measure.

According to Chang, ‘This always on, always connected, lifestyle is what is fuelling digital burnout. It has rewired our brains to be on a permanent multi-tasking mode. Our new default reaction to any spare time is to delve back into cyberspace. Just watch people at an airport, or any place where they are required to wait for any length of time: they will no doubt be locked into their mobile devices. No one simply stares into space anymore.’

South Africans spend on average more than seven hours a day on consuming media. Unlike a physical store, the internet is available 24/7 and we need to ensure that we are mindful of going down the rabbit hole of information overload. The internet is increasingly commercialised and as marketers, we want to make use of the platform to reach our customers whereever they are travelling on the net.

I find this ever-connected world we live in so fascinating. Everything changes at the speed of light. There is even a word to describe snubbing someone you’re talking to by looking at your phone – ‘Phubbing’. I am sure you have experienced this at least once in your life?

The simple solution to this phenomenon is to be aware of the time we spend on digital media and make a conscious effort to give our minds a break from the hyperactivity caused by engaging with digital media for prolonged periods. Go back to basics – your physical self will thank you for it.

MINT GROUP OF COMPANIES www.mintgroup.net

Outsourcing Versus Insourcing Your Marketing

Outsourcing Versus Insourcing Your Marketing
Image source: www.firejuice.co.za

Doing marketing successfully requires a close finger on the pulse. The marketing function does not operate in a silo and keeping it outsourced will make it difficult to do the necessary adjustments and measure a return on investment. Marketing is like a child – it can give you great joy, but you need to keep a constant eye on it.

You should not outsource your marketing; rather you should gradually insource it. Marketing is simply too important a business function, with too much room for nonsense to trust outsiders for extended periods of time. Your marketing should be an in-house function.

However, in saying that, having certain partners to help with specialised tasks is a good idea. Developing your brand identity is something that requires a professional and a classically trained graphic designer.

Clearly, you don’t need someone like this on an ongoing basis. The same is true for building your website or printing a new brochure. These are once-off functions that should be outsourced. But ongoing communication should not be outsourced, at least not as a long term solution.

Ongoing marketing activities should gradually be performed inside the business. Your business should do its own social media, its own website maintenance, its own copywriting and track its own marketing analytics. In short, you need to take ownership of your marketing because this is the only way you will seriously engage with it and ensure it is properly integrated into your sales process.

Since the onset of digital marketing, it has become customary for agencies to bamboozle clients with technicalities, letting them believe they can’t do it themselves. The simple truth is marketing is too important for business growth to outsource it. The question is not ‘what marketing functions should I outsource?’, but rather ‘how can I gradually develop an in-house marketing department?’

What functions should you bring in-house and in which order? The way to determine this is through a marketing plan. This clarifies what marketing your business will do, how much you will invest in each function and who will be doing what. It is at this last stage where you should take the chance to insource as much as possible.

FIREJUICE
bernard@firejuice.co.za
www.firejuice.co.za

Rocket Creative Celebrates 21 Years

Rocket Creative Celebrates 21 Years

Launched in February 1998, Rocket Creative has evolved exponentially to become an innovative player in the design and display industry.

Richard Nilson, Rocket Creative’s founder and MD said, ‘February 2019 represents our company’s 21st anniversary, and we couldn’t be more elated. We had a very positive year in 2018, and based on the state of the industry, this seems to be more the exception than the norm.’

The expansion of the business, coupled with a focus on quality client service and delivery, confirmed that the company needed to boost their team. The company was very fortunate to have a few talented members join them, with the newest employees appointed primarily to boost the company’s client liaison resource, as well as to up-skill production and operational support infrastructure. Having found their feet, the skills and capability enhancement of the new team members have already added substantial value to the operation.

‘We were very fortunate to be entrusted with many amazing projects throughout the year. We handled a very broad range of display manufacturing work ranging from trendsetting interior ‘store-in-stores’ to large scale eventing projects, brand activation furniture, retail and product merchandising displays as well as virtually everything else in-between,’ Nilson concluded.

ROCKET CREATIVE (+27 11) 262 4698 hello@rocketcreative.co.za www.rocketcreative.co.za

Ethics Behind Low Paying Creative Internships

Ethics Behind Low Pay Creative Internships
Image Source: shutterstock

Tracey Hadfield from Friends of Design Academy of Digital Arts states that when searching through the job listings for creative careers in South Africa, you’ll start to notice a curious trend emerging.

While middle and heavy-weights are in relatively high demand, entry-level junior positions (as in, open to graduates with no on-the-job experience) appear to have become an endangered species. In their place, low or no-pay ‘creative internships’ are proliferating at an astonishing rate – something that has industry veterans, educators and savvy graduates seriously questioning the ethics behind this trend.

‘There’s absolutely nothing wrong with legitimate internship programmes,’ said Kate Hilson, Head of Graphic Design at Friends of Design Academy of the Digital Arts. ‘Having the opportunity to learn the inner workings of a studio or agency under the mentorship of a seasoned professional can be really valuable when you’re just starting out. The problem is, some companies seem to be redefining what an internship is, and that new definition sounds an awful lot like an underpaid junior-level job.’

According to Kerry Hugill, Head of Web at Friends of Design, the requirements lists for these internships are often a dead giveaway that they’re not the supportive learning experiences they’re supposed to be.

‘We’ve seen job specs for year-long ‘internships’ that involve a huge amount of responsibility, with virtually zero supervision and full accountability,’ Hilson said. ‘A lot of them would be a handful for a junior, let alone an intern, but instead of a junior’s salary, they pay anything from R2000 to R5000 a month. That’s so far from fair compensation that it would be laughable if it wasn’t so shocking.’

Apparently, the typical excuse for these pitiful wages is that recent graduates don’t contribute meaningfully to the workforce straight out of college. ‘That might be a valid argument if we were talking about an internship where the graduate is doing odd-jobs and absorbing the agency experience for a couple of months,’ said Hilson, ‘but that’s not what’s actually happening in the majority of cases. These supposed interns are being tossed straight into the deep end, are expected to produce professional-quality, income-generating work, and are then paid less than R100 a day for the privilege.’

‘If a person’s work is good enough to use, it’s good enough to pay for,’ said Hugill. ‘Rebranding a junior role as an internship doesn’t give you licence to pay a pittance for someone’s skill. You may as well be asking these kids to work for exposure – that’s not a growth opportunity, it’s exploitation.’

As for using internships to weed out underperforming juniors, a year seems excessive in comparison to other industries’ typical three month probation period.

‘It’s not as if employers are hiring graduates, blind,’ said Hilson. ‘They vet portfolios, check references, and have face-to-face interviews. If, after that whole process, you still think it’s going to take a year to bring a candidate up to speed, you might want to hire a different person or source your graduates from a better-quality college.’

But what options do creative graduates have when every Tom, Dick and Harry seems to be trying to take advantage? ‘We teach our students that when a company is interviewing you, you should be interviewing them, too,’ said Hugill. ‘If you think the relationship is going to be one-sided, and there’s no room for negotiation, it’s honestly better to just walk away. Real jobs are out there, I promise – 85 percent of our students get a job within three months of graduation. You just need to do the prep and have the confidence to go out and find them.’

It’s not just up to students to say no to exploitation, however. ‘As an industry, we really need to rethink the message that we’re sending,’ said Hilson. ‘So much of the world already undervalues what we do – let’s not add our voice to those saying our skills aren’t worth paying for. If we band together and put our experience to better use nurturing our juniors, we can create a more resilient, more effective and more valuable industry for all of us.’

Join Friends of Design in speaking out against institutions and designers taking advantage of young graduates in creative fields.

FRIENDS OF DESIGN ACADEMY OF DIGITAL ARTS friendsofdesign.net

Interactive Digital Signage Is A Must

Interactive Digital Signage Is A Must
Marketing manager at Agosto Inc, Kelsey Moen, says that no matter what industry you use it in, interactive digital signage can make your content more impactful, engaging and exciting. Just like people are more likely to remember something if they write it down, they are also more likely to remember something if they have to engage with it, rather than just see it. We only remember 10 percent of what we read. We only remember 20 percent of what we hear. We only remember 30 percent of what we see. But we remember 80 percent of what we personally experience. That’s where interactive signs come in. Not convinced interactive digital signage is for you? Here’s three reasons why it is a must. 1. It’s engaging What are you most likely to stop and look at: a screen with a slogan and photo or a screen that offers you the choice to look at whatever content you’re most interested in? Probably the second option, right? 81 percent of survey respondents said that interactive content grabs attention more effectively than static content. So yes, it’s pretty obvious that we’re more likely to approach an interactive kiosk than a static sign (even if it’s on a digital screen). With interactive marketing, your business can grow brand awareness, differentiate from your competition, increase customer loyalty and increase profits. In retail, making digital signage advertisements interactive increases a shopper’s likelihood to impulse buy. In fact, 70 percent of marketers found that interactive content is more effective in converting visitors. So, instead of displaying a photo or video of your products, get creative and think of ways your customers can engage with your products digitally. 2. It’s memorable Going back to the above example: what are you most likely to remember: a screen with a slogan and photo; or a screen that offers you the choice to look at whatever content you’re most interested in? Again, probably the second option! That’s because digital signage is inherently more memorable than traditional, static digital signage. Interactive advertising manages to hold the attention of the consumer longer, leading to a better chance of that consumer remembering your brand. Actually, unaided brand recall was eight percent higher for interactive ads, and 10 percent higher for aided brand recall — for example when viewing a subsequent ad or piece of marketing. Today the average person is bombarded with the equivalent of 174 newspapers of data every single day. That’s a lot of distracting information! In reality, the average person only retains about 10 percent of the information we hear, three days after we hear it. So, by making our digital signage interactive, it increases the likelihood that your content will be retained among the 174-newspapers-worth of information we absorb in a given day. 3. It’s impactful We can’t emphasise enough that consumers are demanding more and more from businesses. They’re looking for personable, meaningful interactions among a sea of constant distraction. This is exactly what makes having the ability to actually interest and engage them with your content so impactful. By integrating interactive content into your digital signage strategy, you make it easier to gather impactful metrics — how many people are interacting, what are they interacting with, for how long, where are they dropping off, etc. You open up the doors to help make data-driven decisions that will ultimately impact your bottom line. At the end of the day, it is of course important to carefully consider what content works best for your digital strategy and customer profiles. If interactive digital signage sounds like a good fit for both, you could be on the cusp of something incredibly impactful. This article was sourced from: www.digitalsignagetoday.com

Qwick Media Unveils 3D Wayfinding Water Kiosk

Qwick Media Unveils 3D Wayfinding Water Kiosk
Qwick Media’s Waterfillz is a self-service kiosk for the water refill station sector, that can be customised with digital signage or touchscreen features. Waterfillz provides 94,635 litres (25,000 gallons) of purified water per filter. Its touchscreen technology offers a variety of helpful self-service functions, including 2D and 3D way-finding, a media player, time and weather, directory search and custom apps. The kiosk can be custom branded for marketing and advertising purposes. Water refill stations are used in environments ranging from hotels to campuses to office buildings. QWICK MEDIA www.qwickmedia.com

Alliance Media Scoops Best OOH Company Award In Namibia

Alliance Media Scoops Best OOH Company Award In Namibia

Alliance Media Namibia was the overall winner in the Out-of-Home (OOH) category at the Professional Management Review (PMR) awards, which were held at the Safari Hotel in Windhoek on 26 February 2019. The Alliance Media team scored the highest out of all the industry players.

Greg Benatar, Group Sales Director at Alliance Media said, ’The Alliance Media Namibia team has been truly committed to Outdoor and Airport advertising in Namibia, and the award further solidifies their position as the market leader in OOH in Namibia.’

The PMR awards are awarded through an independent survey. The ratings are sourced from top decision-makers to identify leaders in all major industries who contribute to economic growth and development.

Alliance Media has been awarded as the best OOH media company in multiple African markets for the past 10 years. In addition, Alliance Media was awarded the ‘Best Media Owner in Africa’ at the recent 2018 South African Media Awards.

ALLIANCE MEDIA
info@alliancemedia.com
www.alliancemedia.com

What Is The Future Of Signage In South Africa?

Where are consumers driving the signage environment and what changes can we expect to see over the next few years? Industry experts discuss the future of signage in South Africa.

A number of recent marketing trend reports* have indicated that while print is still the most widely used signage solution around the globe, due to the emergence of digital signage and more opportunities for it, print signage is currently experiencing a lower uptake in the marketing mix.

Managing Director of Technique Media, Darren Kirby, believes that the global movement towards digital means that the future of signage in South Africa is ultimately going to be technologically advanced and personal, although there is a long road ahead as marketers weigh up the pros and cons of the commitment to this shift.

Philip Gelderblom, Production Manager at Singh & Sons, said that with post-demographic consumerism driving strategic changes for brands, we are seeing ‘more messaging across many platforms that compete for the consumer’s attention. Signage needs to be bold and visible to be seen, with a simple message to grab the consumer. In future, we will see much more interactivity, electronic signage with varying messaging, and instant gratification interaction between consumer and sign, undoubtedly integrating mobile devices’.

‘Signage will have to be part of a mix of marketing tools. That said, there are risks to traditional signage: the increase in online shopping is breaking the chain between input and decision, and the lure of the cell phone. Most commuters, and even pedestrians, are constantly distracted by their cell phones. They do not see their environment anymore,’ he added.

Vik Norval, Creative Director at Creative Workshop, said that they are seeing a fair number of clients migrating to digital solutions for conducting business, mirroring global trends. ‘The reduction of data costs has allowed for a longer engagement rate. In future, there will be a strong emphasis on brand awareness and identity, and less on ‘glitz and glamour’. Inevitably, consumers will have seen a brand online and signage will serve more as an indicator of location or brand as opposed to a lure,’ he said.

‘Where businesses have a physical footprint there will always be a need for signage, but rather than be a primary marketing tool, it becomes an extension of digital activity. The only consideration from a design perspective is that branding and corporate identity need to be transferable across traditional and digital platforms. Strong, bold designs that work well across all platforms are key, and the use of substrates and quality finishes that are representative of the brand ethos will remain.’

Kirby said, ‘With this in mind, marketers must assess the intentions behind their signage needs. The print signage industry may be seeing somewhat of a decline and all indications of current trends suggest that this will only increase in time, but as Norval stated, where businesses have a physical footprint, there will always be a need for signage. Even if only as an indicator of location. And this is especially true for companies whose main objective is not to directly reach end consumers.’

Ulanda Neveling from Freddy Hirsch Group said, ‘Our brand may consider digital solutions in future for the ease and speed in which it can be done, and for the ability to change messaging regularly at a relatively low price, but currently we use signage to indicate where our premises are located and to create a corporate brand image at our various sites.’

‘Whether your company observes current and future signage trends or not really depends on your brands, audience and objectives, but the future of signage in South Africa – and indeed across the globe – is in an interesting industry to watch. We’re all very excited to see what the future holds,’ concluded Kirby.

TECHNIQUE MEDIA 
+27823917717
darren@techniquemedia.co.za
www.techniquemedia.co.za

*1) Research reports by Mordor Intelligence
https://www.mordorintelligence.com/industry-reports/printed-signage-market
https://www.mordorintelligence.com/industry-reports/global-digital-signage-market-industry

2) Reports by Rohan Ayyar and Katherine Hays at Entreprenuer Magazine
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/235563
https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/326236

3) An insightful article by Cardinal Digital Marketing
https://www.cardinaldigitalmarketing.com/blog/digital-marketing-trends-and-innovative-tactics-for-2019/

CoNext Explores Great Next-Gen Sponsorship Marketing

CoNext Explores Great Next-Gen Sponsorship Marketing
Clive Eksteen, Commercial Director of Cricket SA and Ros Goldin, independent analyst and former Marketing Director for Cricket South Africa.

CoNext’s second Sponsorship Forum, held on 21 February at The Cube WorkSpace in Fourways, explored next-generation marketing and sponsorship best practices.

The panel speakers included Steve Elworthy, Tournament Director of the Cricket World Cup 2019 and member of the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB), Clive Eksteen, the Commercial Director of Cricket SA and Ros Goldin, independent analyst and former Marketing Director for Cricket South Africa.

The CoNext Sponsorship Forum is a platform where local sponsorship, media, marketing and advertising industries and their agencies can gain key learnings from successful sponsorship partnerships in order to grow the quality of work in the African sponsorships arena.

‘Our first, sold out installment of #CoNext focused on the need for brands to partner with rights holders to genuinely unlock value in sponsorships, and was based on a case study between Shield Deodorant (Unilever) and Chelsea FC,’ said CoNext Founder and Managing Director Andrew Ross.

February’s episode two, entitled Adapt or Die, expanded on this narrative, while exploring the need for continued evolution, relevance in the modern sponsorship arena and the evolution of sport for the modern fan.

The modern consumer has evolved faster than expected, and like other entertainment offerings, sport has faced challenges in re-establishing its value proposition to a new and evolving audience. Stadium attendances are dwindling, and rights holders are facing increased competition to attract and retain commercial partners.

Cricket was one of the first mainstream sports to evolve its product to address a new emerging audience, and whatever anyone’s opinion on the Twenty Over (T20) format of the game, it has proved a formidable tool in marketing the sport to new audiences. T20 was developed to satisfy both existing fans who had shorter attention spans, while also expanding an appeal for the game.

CONEXT
info@conext.co.za
www.conext.co.za

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